What is the Scope of WEEE

 

Contained within the written of the WEEE (Waste Electrical & Electronic Equipment) legislation is an exhaustive list of everyday equipment, all of which is now classified as hazardous waste. With insufficient copy space to include the entire list, contained in the list below is an indication of the scope of the legislation, and what now has to be disposed of by a licenced operator.

• Televisions, digital TV decoders, video and DVD players, overhead projectors
• Computers, laptops, printers, mobile phones, MP3 players, camcorders
• Fan heaters, air conditioning units, batteries and power capacitors

The licenced operator has to hold relevant licences which have been issued by the Environment Agency; in addition, any equipment which has data storage capacity is controlled by the Data Protection Act has to be disposed of by a carrier or recycler holding licences issued by the Data Commissioner’s Office.

As well as ninety nine percent of all items of electrical and electronic equipment having combinations of arsenic, bromine, cadmium, lead and mercury as elements of component part manufacture, many items also store data too. Double jeopardy, especially for owners of said equipment when it comes to the issue of safe, ethical, secure and practical disposal of the aforementioned equipment.

The legislation was enacted as a response to the mountain of redundant electrical and electronic equipment, a mountain which is growing exponentially year on year. By 2015 it is estimated the European Union alone will generate some 15 million tonnes and that figure is expected to carry on increasing year on year, at least for the foreseeable future.

By placing the emphasis and responsibility of controlled disposal on the shoulders of business owners and/or asset managers, the tide is beginning to turn. With increasing tonnage year on year now being recycled thereby decreasing the tonnage which is otherwise disposed of, everyone is being made to do their bit in helping protect the environment form potential damage.

To ensure that your business fully complies with all elements of the WEEE legislation, contact the team at Dynamic Asset Recovery today; secure, safe and ethical disposal is guaranteed and collection can be arranged from any location in the UK.

Specific Items covered by WEEE

 

The items which are contained in the following list, although not claiming to be an exhaustive list are now classified as hazardous waste, therefore licenced handling, carriage and disposal is required as laid down in the WEEE (Waste Electrical & Electronic Equipment) legislation.

  • Televisions, digital TV decoders, video and DVD players
  • Computers, laptops, printers, mobile phones,
  • Blackberries and other handheld devices
  • Mobile phones

The legislation was introduced in 2007 as a method of tackling the year on year exponential increase in the numbers of electrical and electronic equipment which was being disposed of, and although there was a voluntary code for ethical and safe disposal, it was not enforceable by law. The legislation places a duty of care on all owners and custodians of business entities and commercial enterprises to manage and monitor the entire lifecycle of any equipment which is operated by AC and/or DC power.

Business owners and asset managers are required to keep records of acquisition, deployment, use and disposal of said equipment; disposal has to be by way of an orgainsation and/or company licenced by the Environment Agency. In addition, any carrier, operator and/or recycler disposing of equipment with an element of data storage has also to hold relevant licences issued by the Data Commissioner’s Office in order to comply with the Data Protection Act.

The reason for the legislation was to make practical provision for the disposal of toxic substances and heavy elements including but not limited to arsenic, bromine, cadmium, lead and mercury all of which are used in the manufacture of electrical component parts. The casings of monitors, computers, PC tablets and laptops in addition to the glass screens and metal frames where applicable are all recyclable.

Indeed, some ninety to ninety five percent of every piece of electrical and electronic equipment is recyclable; therefore, the pressure on the environment and the potential for catastrophic pollution is being reduced exponentially year on year.

Undertaking safe and ethical disposal by way of a licenced operator for safe, secure and ethical disposal of any redundant and/or surplus electronic and electrical equipment, contact Data Asset Recovery as the essential link in your WEEE disposal chain.

 

What is the current UK WEEE Legislation?

 

Introduced into UK legislation in 2007 the Waste Electronic and Electrical Equipment (WEEE), the regulations have been successful in tidying up the ambiguity surrounding the issue of hazardous and toxic materials which are elements of the component parts of electronic equipment. The items contained in the following list are now all classed as hazardous waste, and as such are required to be disposed of by licenced operators and recyclers.

  • Televisions, digital TV decoders, video and DVD players, overhead projectors
  • Computers, laptops, printers, mobile phones, MP3 players, camcorders
  • Batteries, (vehicle and hand held device)
  • Fan heaters and air conditioning units
  • Microwave ovens, kettles, food processors etc

It is by no means an exhaustive list and is merely in place as an example of items which are used in the workplace, and which business owners and asset managers are required to maintain records of in asset registers. These typical items of equipment along with many other examples all contain elements such as cadmium, mercury, arsenic, bromine and lead; dumped in landfill prior to the introduction of the legislation, the potential of leaching back into the environment was a real and present danger.

Any equipment which is disposed of either as redundant, damaged or beyond repair has to be by way of a licenced operator, a company or organisation which holds licences issued by the Environment Agency. In addition, if any equipment has data storage capacity the disposal agency or operator has to hold a licence granted by the Data Commissioners office. The operators in question have to prove, prior to obtaining their licences that the staff is suitably trained in hazardous waste collection, transport and disposal methods.

The regulations are helping in no small way to defuse the ticking time bomb of the increasing tonnage of waste electronic equipment which is rising exponentially year on year. To ensure your business fully complies with all elements of the WEEE legislation in the disposal of redundant electronic and/or electrical equipment, consult Dynamic Asset Recovery today; secure, safe and ethical disposal is guaranteed and collection can be arranged from any location in the UK.